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Journal of Plant Registrations
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TAM KJ-Q14 ESU and TAM 12J-39 ESU upland cotton germplasm with improved fiber bundle strength

C. Wayne Smith,

Corresponding Author

C. Wayne Smith

Dep. of Soil and Crop Sciences, Texas A&M Univ., 370 Olsen Blvd., College Station, TX, 77843-2474 USA

Correspondence

C. Wayne Smith, Dep. of Soil and Crop Sciences, Texas A&M Univ., 370 Olsen Blvd., College Station, TX 77843-2474, USA.

Email: cwsmith@tamu.edu

Contribution: Conceptualization, Data curation, Formal analysis, Funding acquisition, ​Investigation, Methodology, Project administration, Supervision, Writing - original draft

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Kolbyn Joy,

Kolbyn Joy

Bayer U.S.–Crop Science, 3410 North Elm Ave, Lubbock, TX, 79403 USA

Contribution: Data curation, ​Investigation, Writing - review & editing

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Steve Hague,

Steve Hague

Dep. of Soil and Crop Sciences, Texas A&M Univ., 370 Olsen Blvd., College Station, TX, 77843-2474 USA

Contribution: Data curation, ​Investigation, Writing - review & editing

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Eric Hequet,

Eric Hequet

Dep. of Plant and Soil Science, Texas Tech Univ., 2911 15th Street, Lubbock, TX, 79409-2122 USA

Contribution: Data curation, ​Investigation, Writing - review & editing

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Brendan Kelly,

Brendan Kelly

Dep. of Plant and Soil Science, Texas Tech Univ., 2911 15th Street, Lubbock, TX, 79409-2122 USA

Contribution: Data curation, ​Investigation, Writing - review & editing

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Don Jones,

Don Jones

Cotton Incorporated, 6399 Weston Parkway, Cary, NC, 27513 USA

Contribution: Funding acquisition, Writing - review & editing

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First published: 06 May 2021

Assigned to Associate Editor Jenny Clement Koebernick.

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Abstract

Production of quality cotton yarns depends on cotton fibers that are long, strong, and uniform in length. Upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) yarn produced in the United States is spun predominately on open-end spinning technology, while globally, ring technology predominates. Open-end technology offers speed of production, while ring offers flexibility in size and quality of yarn. A newer technology, vortex spinning, provides spinning speeds that exceed that of open-end spinning and is 30 times that of ring spinning. In order for upland cotton fibers to compete with man-made fibers as newer technology is adopted, breeders must develop genotypes that produce longer, stronger, and finer fibers that are more uniform in length distribution. The Cotton Improvement Program at Texas A&M AgriLife Research has developed and released upland cotton germplasm with fiber length equal to that of pima cotton (G. barbadense L.) and fiber strength greater than upland cultivars currently marketed. TAM KJ-Q14 ESU (extra strength upland) and TAM 12J-39 ESU (Reg. no. GP-1084, PI 698109 and Reg. no. GP-1085 PI 698110, respectively) were developed as part of the effort to provide upland cotton breeders with parental material to incorporate fiber strength into new cultivars. TAM KJ-Q14 ESU combines excellent fiber length with fiber strength exceeding 350 kN m kg–1 while TAM 12J-39 ESU combines competitive yield potential with fiber strength exceeding 350 kN m kg–1. Both germplasm lines will provide breeders with additional sources of excellent fiber strength in good to excellent agronomic profiles.